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The Art Institute of Chicago Has Put 50,000 High-Res Images from Their Collection Online

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Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

The Art Institute of Chicago recently unveiled a new website design. As part of their first design upgrade in 6 years, they have placed more than 52,000 high-resolution images from their collection online, available to all comers without restriction.

Students, educators, and just regular art lovers might be interested to learn that we’ve released thousands of images in the public domain on the new website in an open-access format (52,438 to be exact, and growing regularly). Made available under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license, these images can be downloaded for free on the artwork pages.

We’ve also enhanced the image viewing capabilities on object pages, which means that you can see much greater detail on objects than before. Check out the paint strokes in Van Gogh’s The Bedroom, the charcoal details on Charles White’s Harvest Talk, or the synaesthetic richness of Georgia O’Keeffe’s Blue and Green Music.

I’ve included a few notable works from their collection above: The Great Wave by Katsushika Hokusai, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat (which you can zoom and pretend you’re Cameron in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off), Self-Portrait by Vincent van Gogh, Nighthawks by Edward Hopper, Mao by Andy Warhol, and Two Sisters (On the Terrace) by Pierre-Auguste Renoir. The resolution on the images is high enough to check out the brushstrokes on the paintings. Here’s some detail on the van Gogh:

Art Institute Chicago

I love seeing more museums doing this.

Tags: art   Art Institute of Chicago   museums
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StunGod
4 days ago
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Thanks Art Institute!
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth
cjheinz
5 days ago
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#art

Interview with Brush and Pounce

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A few years ago a friend introduced me to the work of artist and sign painter Christian Shaknaitis who goes by the business name Brush and Pounce. Eventually through Instagram I found out we both have a deep appreciation for ghost signs.

If you are not familiar with this term, “ghost signs” refers to hand painted signage you see on the sides of buildings that are most likely faded. This form of advertisement was popular in the early 1900’s but the practice of hand-painting signs on buildings fell away in the late 20th century.

Photo by Brush and Pounce

Looking through Christian’s work, his aesthetic is reminiscent of that time and reminds me how certain design movements can make a come back. Whenever I’m walking around, I love it when I recognize one of his handcrafted signs. I was excited to have the opportunity to visit Brush and Pounce’s studio to see what he’s been up to and ask him a few questions:

How did you get into the sign painting business:

That depends: When did I start this business for myself? Or when did I start painting signs? I have been doing art of some sort for most of my life, and over the years I have had various opportunities to make “signs” and design logos for various clients. Much of the style and technique I worked with pointed in the direction of sign painting- without me even knowing it! I have always been passionate about lettering, type and old signage. But it wasn’t until around 2007 that I was working for a family run business back home and my talent was discovered, leading to me becoming their in-house sign maker for over a year and a half. When I moved to Pittsburgh in 2009, word spread of my skills and I started to get sign work outside of my regular jobs. The timing was right, with Pittsburgh’s revival and new businesses were opening weekly, keeping me very busy as that continues today.

Sign painting has made a bit of come back, how has that impacted your business:

It has impacted it greatly. My clients have a true appreciation for hand crafted work and I feel that is something that spreads throughout all skilled crafts these days, from jewelry making to fashion/style to art and beyond. The talents have always been there, but folks are interested and willing to pay for it these days. It gives a business a very personal touch to have a one of a kind logo or sign designed and fabricated for them. It set’s them apart from the common day brands we all grew up with and can overlook.

There’s a number of techniques that go into traditional sign painting, can you tell us which one has been the most rewarding to learn:

All of them, to be honest! Haha! Gold leaf/glass gilding has been one of the most challenging techniques to learn. It’s very meticulous and requires a lot of attention. Anything can go wrong! But truthfully, all of the work I do is rewarding. It’s a constant learning experience, because no two jobs are the same. A lot of problem solving.

Example of his gold leaf work

Signs he was working on for the Abby when I visited

What are some of the challenges you run into: 

There can be obvious challenges, like weather, location/access, difficult clients (which is very rare), creative blocks, etc., but I think the biggest challenge for me, has been learning to run a business. That was a big learning curve for me, not having any previous “real” experience. All the background stuff, like billing and taxes and such. It can be intimidating, but like riding a bicycle, once you learn……

Photo from the Abbey on Butler

Sign collaboration with the Pittsburgh Lettering club

Photo by Brush and Pounce – recent sign work for Gold Dust is so beautiful!

Photo by Brush and Pounce

I want to thank Christian for taking the time to chat with me and letting me check out his studio. If you need beautiful signage for your business, get in touch with him by email: brushandpounce@gmail.com or you can find him here or on Instagram.

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An Election Day Message From Your Benevolent Overlord

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Kusama: Infinity documentary in Pittsburgh, from November 16.

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The 2018 documentary Kusama: Infinity will play at the Row House Cinema from November 16 as part of its "In Case You Missed It" series.
Now the top-selling female artist in the world, Yayoi Kusama overcame impossible odds to bring her radical artistic vision to the world stage. For decades, her work pushed boundaries that often alienated her from both her peers and those in power in the art world. Kusama was an underdog with everything stacked against her: the trauma of growing up in Japan during World War II, life in a dysfunctional family that discouraged her creative ambitions, sexism and racism in the art establishment, mental illness in a culture where that was particularly shameful and even continuing to pursue and be devoted to her art full time on the cusp of her 90s. In spite of it all, Kusama has endured and has created a legacy of artwork that spans the disciplines of painting, sculpture, installation art, performance art, poetry and literary fiction. After working as an artist for over six decades, people around the globe are experiencing her installation Infinity Mirrored Rooms in record numbers, as Kusama continues to create new work every day.
Tickets are available online. The single-screen theater is located at 4115 Butler Street in Lawrenceville (map).
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etwilson
31 days ago
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Oh, hello.

Amazon reportedly scraps internal AI recruiting tool that was biased against women

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Bias in machine learning can be a problem even for companies with plenty of experience with AI, like Amazon. According to a report from Reuters, the e-commerce giant had to scrap an internal project that was trying to use AI to vet job applications after the software consistently downgraded female candidates.

Because AI systems learn to make decisions by looking at historical data they often perpetuate existing biases. In this case, that bias was the male-dominated working environment of the tech world. According to Reuters, Amazon’s program penalized applicants who attended all-women’s colleges, as well as any resumes that contained the word “women’s” (as might appear in the phrase “women’s chess club”).

The team behind the project...

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