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Respite Thread For TaMara

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I’ll bet Penelope could easily compete.

The post Respite Thread For TaMara appeared first on Balloon Juice.

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These Camera-Themed Playing Cards are Also a Photography Cheat Sheet

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Here’s an interesting idea: what if you could teach someone all of the basics of photography by simply giving them a deck of playing cards? That’s exactly what a new Kickstarter campaign for the so-called “Photography Deck” wants to deliver.

The Photography Deck is a specially-designed deck of playing cards that will appeal to the camera nerds in the audience (so… most of you). The court cards—King, Queen, and Joker—have each been re-designed with a photography twist, while the number cards each act as a miniature “cheat sheet” for concepts ranging from the exposure triangle, to color theory, composition, reading the histogram, setting white balance, and more.

Each suit covers one of four categories: Spades is Camera Basics, Hearts is Composition, Clubs is Technical info, and Diamonds covers Shooting Styles.

It’s a simple-but-brilliant little idea, and a fun way to add an educational twist to an old classic. If you’re going to keep a set of playing cards in your camera bag, these could actually come in handy for something other than the odd game of Spades during downtime on set.

Here’s a quick intro and unboxing so you can see what The Photography Deck is about:

And here’s a closer look at the design:

The campaign launched earlier today, but it’s already well past full-funding and has even been selected as a “project we love” by Kickstarter. With 30 days left, filmmaker and Photography Deck creator Eric Bohring has already raised nearly $5,000 on a goal of just over $1,100.

If you want to pledge your support and “reserve” a Photography Deck for yourself, you can get a “standard” red deck for $14 or a Kickstarter-only “limited edition” green deck for $17. Both variants are expected to start shipping to backers in August.

As with all Kickstarters, the usual warnings apply: this is not a pre-order, and you pledge at your own risk. That said, Bohring has already successfully funded and shipped a popular camera accessory called The Tech Wrap, so he’s proven that his business model isn’t vaporware. To find out more about The Photography Deck or support this project, head over to the Kickstarter campaign at this link.

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Vintage Natural Science and Astronomy Illustrations Adorn Face Masks by Maria Popova

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All images courtesy of Society6

Maria Popova, of Brain Pickings, has released a series of face masks that bring a dose of history to the modern-day essential. Each fabric covering is adorned with a vintage natural history or astronomy illustration, including Ellen Harding Baker’s solar system quilt, Ernst Haeckel’s renderings of jellyfish, and irises and other medicinal plants originally painted by Elizabeth Blackwell in the 18th century. “Because of the mask’s particular folding pattern, some of the artwork came alive in a wholly new and unexpected way,” Popova writes in a post.

My personal favorite — the original design I made for myself and my most beloved human — is the total solar eclipse mask, evocative of the opening line of astronomer and poet Rebecca Elson’s magnificent “Antidotes to Fear of Death”: “Sometimes as an antidote, To fear of death, I eat the stars.”

Explore the full collection and pick up your own on Society6. You also might enjoy these artist-designed masks.

 

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The Best Instant Noodles, According to Chefs, Cookbook Authors, and Ramen Fanatics

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Instant noodles are steeped in more than just hot water and seasoning. They’re also steeped in historical and cultural significance. Momofuku Ando created instant noodles in 1958 as a postwar invention to help curb world hunger, and since then, they’ve bloomed into a huge industry, inspiring museums, poems, and prison bartering systems. They’re simultaneously embraced as cheap sustenance, proffered as a way to help future food shortages, and used as a backdrop for culinary experimentation—all of which makes them perfect for our current moment. That, plus the simple fact that a great bowl of instant noodles is comforting and delightful to slurp: warm, carby, salty, and delicious.

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This Japanese Zoo is Using Stuffed Capybaras to Visualize Social Distancing

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All images by @chacha0rca

Take a seat for lunch at Izu Shabonten Zoo in Shizuoka, Japan, and meet your plush dining partners. To help restaurant patrons visualize social distancing guidelines, the zoo has occupied chairs with stuffed capybaras. The soft toys encourage diners to space out among the tables and maintain an appropriate distance.

With only a few other cuddly creatures in the mix, the institution’s main choice is a nod to its decades-long fascination with the giant rodent. Izu Zoo boasts a plethora of capybara-themed programming and souvenirs and also is credited with creating open-air hot baths in 1982 that offer the animals, which are native to South America, a place to bathe, relax, and warm up during cold winters.

Although many of us won’t be visiting the wild creatures in the near future, you can get a glimpse at their steamy retreats below. For similarly visual social distancing, check out Singapore’s tape demarcations. (via Spoon & Tamago)

 

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wurly
73 days ago
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Fun.

Tuxedoed Penguins Plunge into A Private Tour of the Nelson-Atkinson Museum of Art

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All images © Nelson-Atkins Museum, by Gabe Hopkins

On a recent trip to the Nelson-Atkinson Museum of Art, three penguins from the Kansas City Zoo were keen to ruffle some feathers. As they waddled along their private tour— the museum currently is closed to humans due to COVID-19—Bubbles, Maggie, and Berkley served some polarizing opinions. Executive director and CEO Julián Zugazagoitia said the tuxedoed guests “seemed to react much better to Caravaggio than Monet,” whose work they only glance at in a video of their trip.

Despite the cold shoulders that they gave the French painter, zoo officials said the penguins enjoyed interacting with some new faces. “Unfortunately, our penguins can’t speak for themselves, but we think they found the experience at the museum very enriching.”

Zugazagoitia also noted that he spoke Spanish to the three birds, who are native to Chile and Peru, in order to break the ice and make them feel a little bit more comfortable in the space. All three are Humboldt penguins under eight years old, meaning that they’ve got more time to refine their tastes. The South American birds generally live more than 30 years.

The museum’s resident photographer Gabe Hopkins captured much of the sophisticated guest’s visit, which he’s shared on Flickr. (via ArtNet News)

 

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