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LG will show a ‘capsule-based craft beer’ machine at CES next month

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LG has announced a “capsule-based craft beer system,” because nothing says “craft” more than easy one-button operation. It’s called the LG HomeBrew, of course, and LG will be unveiling it in full at CES next month. The capsules contain malt, yeast, hop oil, and flavoring, while the machine “automates the whole procedure from fermentation, carbonation and aging to serving and cleaning,” according to LG.

The HomeBrew will have five beers available: an American IPA, an American pale ale, an English stout, a Belgian-style Witbier, and a dry Czech pilsner. LG says that the machine will take around two weeks to produce up to five liters, though that’ll depend on the beer type. There’s a mobile companion app where you can check on the status of...

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Portraits of Dogs Before and After Japanese Grooming

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Dog lover and animal photographer Grace Chon has expanded her ongoing project Hairy, which features portraits of dogs before and after they receive haircuts.

“All the dogs have been groomed in a Japanese grooming style,” Chon says. “Japanese dog grooming does not follow the rules of traditional, breed-standard grooming. In fact, it only has one mission ― to bring out the dogs’ individual personalities and make them look as adorable as possible!

“With extreme attention to detail and careful consideration of a pup’s best attributes, Japanese dog groomers and salons achieve the perfect transformations by forgetting the uniform looks and getting creative.”

As with the dogs in the first series that we shared a couple of years ago, these dogs were groomed at Healthy Spot in Los Angeles, where many groomers specialize in Japanese grooming.

You can find more of Chon’s work on her website and Instagram. Chon has also published her work in a book titled Puppy Styled.

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San Francisco Poised To Eliminate Parking Minimums Citywide

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An empty parking lot in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

San Francisco has become the first major U.S. city to propose removing all parking minimums, with legislation introduced in October, Quartz reports.

The city’s minimum parking requirements, which date to the 1950s, require one car space per residential unit, the nonprofit Livable City says. However, San Francisco has been rolling back minimum parking requirements around transit since BART opened in the 1970s, the SF Examiner reported. The new legislation, introduced by Supervisor Jane Kim, would eliminate minimum parking requirements citywide.

Developers in San Francisco already avoid building car parking by providing alternatives like bike parking, the Examiner says. The legislation would simply formalize what many developers already practice — avoiding building expensive parking spaces.

Meanwhile, office parking (which would also have their minimum requirements lifted under Kim’s legislation) is already tight, Bisnow reports, fretting that lifting minimum parking requirements would further squeeze commuters. But with only 70 percent of commuters in the Bay Area driving to work, San Francisco has one of the lowest proportion of car commuters in the nation, the publication said. The parking ratio of spaces to square feet of office space is also among the nation’s lowest, with two spots per thousand square feet.

Kim stresses that removing minimum parking requirements would not “prohibit parking in any redevelopment. It would merely remove the requirement that a developer would have to build a minimum number of parking spaces,” she said during a hearing Monday.

The move is likely to be hailed by developers, as the cost of building a parking space in San Francisco is the highest on the U.S. mainland, according to author Donald Shoup. At $38,000 for one below-ground space, only Honolulu is more expensive. Another study found that building parking drives up the cost of building housing so much that 700,000 carless renters nationwide are paying a collective $440 million a year for parking spaces they’ll never use.

Paul Chasan, a city planner for San Francisco, told the Examiner that he thinks some developers will still build parking where economics allow it — or neighbors demand it.

“They operate under political constraints where the neighborhoods will probably pressure them to build parking,” he said.

If the legislation passes, San Francisco will be the largest city, by far, to fully eliminate parking minimums — and the second nationwide. Hartford, Connecticut, a city of 125,000, did so in 2017. Dozens of other cities have relaxed parking minimums or removed them in transit corridors, Governing magazine reports. In Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, until parking minimums were waived, usable buildings sat vacant because of the cost of adding parking, or torn down to make parking spaces for other developments, Governing says.

The full board of supervisors votes next week on the legislation.

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The Art Institute of Chicago Has Put 50,000 High-Res Images from Their Collection Online

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Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

Art Institute Chicago

The Art Institute of Chicago recently unveiled a new website design. As part of their first design upgrade in 6 years, they have placed more than 52,000 high-resolution images from their collection online, available to all comers without restriction.

Students, educators, and just regular art lovers might be interested to learn that we’ve released thousands of images in the public domain on the new website in an open-access format (52,438 to be exact, and growing regularly). Made available under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license, these images can be downloaded for free on the artwork pages.

We’ve also enhanced the image viewing capabilities on object pages, which means that you can see much greater detail on objects than before. Check out the paint strokes in Van Gogh’s The Bedroom, the charcoal details on Charles White’s Harvest Talk, or the synaesthetic richness of Georgia O’Keeffe’s Blue and Green Music.

I’ve included a few notable works from their collection above: The Great Wave by Katsushika Hokusai, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat (which you can zoom and pretend you’re Cameron in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off), Self-Portrait by Vincent van Gogh, Nighthawks by Edward Hopper, Mao by Andy Warhol, and Two Sisters (On the Terrace) by Pierre-Auguste Renoir. The resolution on the images is high enough to check out the brushstrokes on the paintings. Here’s some detail on the van Gogh:

Art Institute Chicago

I love seeing more museums doing this.

Tags: art   Art Institute of Chicago   museums
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2 public comments
StunGod
32 days ago
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Thanks Art Institute!
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth
cjheinz
32 days ago
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#art

Interview with Brush and Pounce

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A few years ago a friend introduced me to the work of artist and sign painter Christian Shaknaitis who goes by the business name Brush and Pounce. Eventually through Instagram I found out we both have a deep appreciation for ghost signs.

If you are not familiar with this term, “ghost signs” refers to hand painted signage you see on the sides of buildings that are most likely faded. This form of advertisement was popular in the early 1900’s but the practice of hand-painting signs on buildings fell away in the late 20th century.

Photo by Brush and Pounce

Looking through Christian’s work, his aesthetic is reminiscent of that time and reminds me how certain design movements can make a come back. Whenever I’m walking around, I love it when I recognize one of his handcrafted signs. I was excited to have the opportunity to visit Brush and Pounce’s studio to see what he’s been up to and ask him a few questions:

How did you get into the sign painting business:

That depends: When did I start this business for myself? Or when did I start painting signs? I have been doing art of some sort for most of my life, and over the years I have had various opportunities to make “signs” and design logos for various clients. Much of the style and technique I worked with pointed in the direction of sign painting- without me even knowing it! I have always been passionate about lettering, type and old signage. But it wasn’t until around 2007 that I was working for a family run business back home and my talent was discovered, leading to me becoming their in-house sign maker for over a year and a half. When I moved to Pittsburgh in 2009, word spread of my skills and I started to get sign work outside of my regular jobs. The timing was right, with Pittsburgh’s revival and new businesses were opening weekly, keeping me very busy as that continues today.

Sign painting has made a bit of come back, how has that impacted your business:

It has impacted it greatly. My clients have a true appreciation for hand crafted work and I feel that is something that spreads throughout all skilled crafts these days, from jewelry making to fashion/style to art and beyond. The talents have always been there, but folks are interested and willing to pay for it these days. It gives a business a very personal touch to have a one of a kind logo or sign designed and fabricated for them. It set’s them apart from the common day brands we all grew up with and can overlook.

There’s a number of techniques that go into traditional sign painting, can you tell us which one has been the most rewarding to learn:

All of them, to be honest! Haha! Gold leaf/glass gilding has been one of the most challenging techniques to learn. It’s very meticulous and requires a lot of attention. Anything can go wrong! But truthfully, all of the work I do is rewarding. It’s a constant learning experience, because no two jobs are the same. A lot of problem solving.

Example of his gold leaf work

Signs he was working on for the Abby when I visited

What are some of the challenges you run into: 

There can be obvious challenges, like weather, location/access, difficult clients (which is very rare), creative blocks, etc., but I think the biggest challenge for me, has been learning to run a business. That was a big learning curve for me, not having any previous “real” experience. All the background stuff, like billing and taxes and such. It can be intimidating, but like riding a bicycle, once you learn……

Photo from the Abbey on Butler

Sign collaboration with the Pittsburgh Lettering club

Photo by Brush and Pounce – recent sign work for Gold Dust is so beautiful!

Photo by Brush and Pounce

I want to thank Christian for taking the time to chat with me and letting me check out his studio. If you need beautiful signage for your business, get in touch with him by email: brushandpounce@gmail.com or you can find him here or on Instagram.

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An Election Day Message From Your Benevolent Overlord

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