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Photos of Zookeepers as the Animals They Care For

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For the past few years, the Minnesota Zoo has been celebrating National Zookeeper Week in mid-July by shooting a set of lighthearted photos in which the zookeepers recreate photos of the zoo’s animals.

“Our dedicated zookeepers are starting to resemble the animals in their care,” the zoo says.

The Minnesota Zoo is located in Apple Valley, Minnesota. You can find out more about it on the zoo’s website and Facebook page.


Image credits: Photographs by the Minnesota Zoo and used with permission

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Android 9 Pie seems to be messing with the Pixel XL’s ability to fast charge

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As with any major software release, Google’s recent launch of Android 9.0 Pie hasn’t gone off without some early bugs and issues. The company just pushed out an Android Auto app update to get its in-car experience working nicely again with Pie, but owners of the original Pixel XL are having some troubles of their own.

Users are reporting that Android Pie has seemingly stopped their phone from fast charging when plugged into many chargers. Even Google’s own charger isn’t working as it should in some cases. Other Pixel XL owners say the bundled charger still functions properly and displays “charging rapidly,” but third-party USB-PD (power delivery) chargers no longer juice up the XL as quickly as they did pre-update. Android Police first...

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Territorial maps of indigenous nations in the Americas & Australia/NZ

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Native Lands Map

Native Lands Map

The Native Land site is a collaborative effort to map the approximate boundaries of the territories and languages of the indigenous nations in the Americas, Australia, and New Zealand.

Tags: maps   Native Americans
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Cameradactyl: A 3D-Printed 4×5 Field Camera with Eye-Popping Looks

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Cameradactyl is a new 3D-printed 4×5 field camera created by photographer Ethan Moses that stands out: instead of a traditional look, the camera comes in a wide range of custom colors and patterns.

“I have built cameras in the past, but always one-offs, out of wood and metal,” Moses writes. “When I got a new 3D printer, I couldn’t help myself. I started designing and printing prototypes of 4×5 cameras that I could reproduce for friends and fellow photographers.

“I am a lover of classic mahogany, brass and steel field cameras, and my goal was to make an accessible and inexpensive alternative. I have tried to retain as much functionality and durability as possible with entirely plastic components. I think I’ve succeeded in making a fun entry-level camera while maintaining its professional attributes.”

It’s an old-school camera made with new-school technologies; a camera with a friendly look on the outside yet serious features on the “inside.”

Based on a classic field camera design, the Cameradactyl retains many of the professional camera movements long used by field camera photographers.

“It has rack and pinion geared focusing rails for both the front and back standards, front swings, tilts, rise and fall, and rear swings and tilts,” Moses says.

The Cameradactyl doesn’t come with lens or film holders, so you’ll need to use your own. The bellows accommodate lenses ranging from 90mm to 300mm.

“Because a large format camera is basically just a black box, the look and feel of your pictures will be mostly determined by your lens and your film or plate choice (and how you use it),” Moses says.

Since the entire camera body is 3D printed, Moses is able to offer custom looks for each camera. The lens board and film back are black on all cameras, but the body features 10 separate part groups — rear frame, front frame, frame carriers, rear rails, front rails, baseplate, swing arms/spindle carriers/tripod mount, screws and spacers, focusing pinions, ground glass spring frame — that you can have printed in other colors.

“I’m currently printing in eight colors, which when raised to the 10th power (# of print/part groups) allows for 1,073,741,824 possible color combinations, before choosing a bellows covering fabric,” Moses writes.

Moses is launching the Cameradactyl through a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign, where a contribution of $225 or more will earn you one of the first cameras if/when the project delivers on its promises in October 2018.

The campaign has already exceeded its initial goal of $2,500, and there are less than 10 backer spots still available at the time of this writing.

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The Best Bike Helmet for Commuters

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Since 2015, we’ve interviewed helmet designers and safety experts, examined more than 70 helmets, and tested 21 in person to determine that the classic Specialized Echelon II is the best bike helmet for commuters. Its superior straps and adjustment system make it easy to dial in a perfect fit. And it’s one of only four helmets sold in the US that’s impact-tested and certified by Snell, one of the most trustworthy third-party labs in the country.

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Google’s Latest Doodle Honors War Photographer Gerda Taro

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Google’s latest homepage Doodle is a tribute to the late war photographer Gerda Taro, who would have turned 108 today. Taro was the woman who invented Robert Capa.

“Though she was tiny in stature, Gerda Taro had the heart of a giant,” Google writes. “Known as ‘the little red fox,’ the ginger-haired photographer fearlessly turned her camera lens to capture sensitive and critical images of conflict around the world, producing powerful black-and-white images that informed readers of the newspaper Ce Soir.

“In fact, Taro is considered to be the first female journalist in the world to cover the front lines of conflict.”

Gerda Taro in July 1937.

Born Gerta Pohorylle, the photographer met a Hungarian Jewish photojournalist named Endre Friedmann in Paris in 1935. After becoming friends and then falling in love, the two changed their names to Gerda Taro and Robert Capa, respectively, in order to break into international markets.

“Capa would go on to co-found the Magnum Photo agency while Taro became known for her fearless reportage,” Google says. “[…] During the last five months of Taro’s short career, she worked alone in Spain before tragically losing her life near El Escorial, northwest of Madrid, while capturing images on the front line of the Spanish Civil War in July 1937.”

Although her war photographs made her a famous photographer in her own right, many of her early photos were misattributed to Capa.

“Here’s to Gerda Taro, who had a photographer’s eye, a journalist’s soul, and a warrior’s courage,” Google says.

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